Tuesday, January 18, 2022  | 14 Jamadilakhir, 1443
Samaa TV
Facebook Twitter Youtube
HOME > Wildlife

Thirty-fifth stranded Indus dolphin rescued from Larkana canal

It has been released in the Sukkur Barrage

SAMAA | - Posted: Oct 30, 2021 | Last Updated: 3 months ago
SAMAA |
Posted: Oct 30, 2021 | Last Updated: 3 months ago

Photo: File

Listen to the story
The Sindh Wildlife Department has rescued another blind Indus dolphin, locally known as Bhulan, from the Warah Canal in Larkana. According to Wildlife Conservator Javed Mahar, the dolphin was stranded in the canal and the one-way flow of water prevented it from traveling back into the main River Indus. "If not rescued, the mortality of the animal becomes its inevitable destiny, which is never desired," he said. On Friday, a team of the wildlife department was dispatched to the canal site. After an operation that lasted at least two hours, the dolphin was rescued. It was later released upstream of the Sukkur Barrage near Seven Sisters, 80km from the canal. One stranded #IndusDolphin successfully rescued from Warah Canal of Larkana,Sindh🇵🇰 & safely released upstream Sukkur Barrage near Seven Sisters.The rescued dolphin taken by road to releasing point, covered distance of more than 80 km in 94 minutes journey.Thanks to Sindh 1/4 pic.twitter.com/hMRizSChEu— SindhWildlife (@sindhwildlife) October 29, 2021 Mahar said this is the 35th rescue operation conducted by the department in the last two years with no mortality during the operation. Earlier this month, on October 23, Sindh Wildlife recovered a baby Indus dolphin lost in the Rice Canal. The animal, too, was released back in the Sukkur Barrage. The blind Indus dolphin is one of the world’s most threatened mammals and has been officially declared endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature or IUCN. There are approximately 2,000 dolphins in Pakistan found in the River Indus from Thatta to Mianwali. Of these, around 1,400 are in Sindh. The blind Indus dolphin is a unique species found only in Pakistan but due to over-fishing, illegal fishing practices, and shrinkage of the River Indus, its population has been threatened.
FaceBook WhatsApp

The Sindh Wildlife Department has rescued another blind Indus dolphin, locally known as Bhulan, from the Warah Canal in Larkana.

According to Wildlife Conservator Javed Mahar, the dolphin was stranded in the canal and the one-way flow of water prevented it from traveling back into the main River Indus.

“If not rescued, the mortality of the animal becomes its inevitable destiny, which is never desired,” he said.

On Friday, a team of the wildlife department was dispatched to the canal site. After an operation that lasted at least two hours, the dolphin was rescued. It was later released upstream of the Sukkur Barrage near Seven Sisters, 80km from the canal.

Mahar said this is the 35th rescue operation conducted by the department in the last two years with no mortality during the operation.

Earlier this month, on October 23, Sindh Wildlife recovered a baby Indus dolphin lost in the Rice Canal. The animal, too, was released back in the Sukkur Barrage.

The blind Indus dolphin is one of the world’s most threatened mammals and has been officially declared endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature or IUCN. There are approximately 2,000 dolphins in Pakistan found in the River Indus from Thatta to Mianwali. Of these, around 1,400 are in Sindh.

The blind Indus dolphin is a unique species found only in Pakistan but due to over-fishing, illegal fishing practices, and shrinkage of the River Indus, its population has been threatened.

 
HOME  
 
 
RELATED STORIES

Tell us what you think:

Your email address will not be published.

FaceBook WhatsApp
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
About Us   |   Anchor Profiles   |   Online Advertising   |   Contact Us   |   Feedback   |   Apps   |   FAQs   |   Authors   |   Comment Policy
Facebook   |   Twitter   |   Instagram   |   YouTube   |   WhatsApp