Tuesday, October 26, 2021  | 19 Rabiulawal, 1443
Samaa TV
Facebook Twitter Youtube
HOME > Technology

Leaves make food from infra-red light, find scientists

We studied photosynthesis at school or how plants use their green pigment or Chlorophyll to make biochemical and oxygen. Up until now, scientists thought that they used the red part of the light spectrum to do this. But as Science magazine reported Friday, infra-red light is also used. Researchers at Imperial College London made the...

SAMAA | - Posted: Jun 15, 2018 | Last Updated: 3 years ago
SAMAA |
Posted: Jun 15, 2018 | Last Updated: 3 years ago


We studied photosynthesis at school or how plants use their green pigment or Chlorophyll to make biochemical and oxygen.

Up until now, scientists thought that they used the red part of the light spectrum to do this. But as Science magazine reported Friday, infra-red light is also used.

Researchers at Imperial College London made the discovery that could rewrite textbooks, the university’s website said.

“It was detected in a wide range of blue-green algae when they grow in near-infrared light, found in shaded conditions like bacterial mats in Yellowstone and in beach rock in Australia,” the report said.

The way chlorophyll absorbs light means only the energy from red light can be used for photosynthesis.

“Since chlorophyll-a is present in all plants, algae and cyanobacteria that we know of, it was considered that the energy of red light set the ‘red limit’ for photosynthesis; that is, the minimum amount of energy needed to do the demanding chemistry that produces oxygen. The red limit is used in astrobiology to judge whether complex life could have evolved on planets in other solar systems.”

However, when researchers found that some bacteria grew in near-infrared light, they realized that they may be looking at a new form of photosynthesis.

FaceBook WhatsApp
 
HOME  
 
 

Comments are closed.

FaceBook WhatsApp
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
About Us   |   Anchor Profiles   |   Online Advertising   |   Contact Us   |   Feedback   |   Apps   |   FAQs   |   Authors   |   Comment Policy
Facebook   |   Twitter   |   Instagram   |   YouTube   |   WhatsApp