You are here:    Home      Posts tagged "study"

Dogs born in summer prone to heart disease: study

Dogs born during summer months run a higher risk of heart and artery problems, according to a study published Thursday in the journal Scientific Reports. The seasonal difference was especially marked — 74 percent higher in July than January — in breeds not genetically prone to cardiovascular disease, leading scientists to speculate that environmental factors…

Read More
 

People are pillaging the world’s protected areas: study

Highways are being paved, oil is being drilled and entire cities are sprouting up inside many of the world’s nature preserves, imperiling the very creatures they are meant to protect, researchers said Thursday. The vast harm being wreaked by people inside protected areas that are home to endangered animals like the eastern black rhinoceros, Sumatran…

Read More
 

Exercise does not delay decline in people with dementia: study

While physical exercise may stave off dementia, it does not delay mental decline in people after they’ve been diagnosed, a study in nearly 500 people with the condition reported Thursday. While a fitness regime improved physical fitness in people with mild to moderate dementia, it “does not slow cognitive impairment,” researchers reported in The BMJ…

Read More
 

Happiness makes hit songs: study

Hit songs today are “happier”, more danceable and more likely to be sung by women than songs that fail to make it to the charts, a study into 30 years of musical evolution revealed Wednesday. But also it noted a somber trend: while people clearly prefer happy music, there is less and less of it….

Read More
 

Sex bias kills 240,000 infant girls in India yearly: study

Almost a quarter-of-a-million girls younger than five die in India every year due to neglect resulting from society’s preference for sons, a gender discrimination study found on Tuesday. This was over and above those aborted simply for being female, researchers wrote in The Lancet medical journal. “Gender-based discrimination towards girls doesn’t simply prevent them from…

Read More
 

Poor diet delays pregnancy, curbs fertility: study

Women who shun fruit or eat lots of fast food take longer to get pregnant and are less likely to conceive within a year, according to a study released Thursday. A nearly no-fruit diet compared to one loaded with three or more pieces per day added about two weeks, on average, to the time of…

Read More
 

Amazon river dolphins in steep decline: study

Two kinds of river dolphins are dying off fast in the Amazon region, and may face extinction unless they are more vigorously protected against fishing, researchers in Brazil said Wednesday. Once considered abundant in the Amazon basin, the boto (Inia geoffrensis) and the tucuxi (Sotalia fluviatilis) are now halving in population every 10 years, said…

Read More
 

Frequent sauna use may cut stroke risk: study

People in Finland who regularly take saunas may face a far lower stroke risk than those who go less often, said a study Wednesday. The report in the journal Neurology is the first to assess the relationship between saunas and strokes, and was based on more than 1,600 people who were followed for an average…

Read More
 

French Bulldog’s cute face exposes it to welfare risks: study

The popularity of the French Bulldog, known to suffer breathing problems due to the same flat face deemed its cutest feature, raises animal welfare concerns, researchers said Thursday. In Britain alone, demand for the short-muzzled, wide-eyed hound has soared, following a global fashion in small, flat-faced dogs. In 2013, 1.46 percent of all puppies born…

Read More
 

Ecstasy may relieve the agony of PTSD: study

Better known to nightclubbers as ecstasy, the euphoria-inducing drug MDMA appears to alleviate Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in war veterans, firefighters, and police officers, researchers said Wednesday. In a trial in the United States, three different doses of the drug were tested on 26 service personnel diagnosed with the debilitating affliction after experiencing trauma in…

Read More
 

Study triples number of known depression genes

A study of nearly half-a-million people has uncovered 30 new genes linked to depression, tripling the number known to play a role in the debilitating disease. The same enlarged basket of depression genes also underpins other psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, a consortium of nearly 250 scientists discovered. “This is a game changer,” said Patrick…

Read More
 

Enzyme that affects ageing, cancer decoded: study

Elated scientists announced Wednesday the completion of a 20-year quest to map the complex enzyme thought to forestall ageing by repairing the tips of chromosomes in plants and animals, including humans. Decoding the architecture of the enzyme, called telomerase, could lead to drugs that slow or block the ageing process, along with new treatments for…

Read More
 

Some antidepressants may be linked to dementia: study

Long-term use of certain anti-depressants have been linked to dementia in a large British study, researchers said Thursday, though they could not definitively conclude that the drugs were the cause. The study in more than 300,000 people in Britain found that those diagnosed with dementia were almost a third more likely to have been prescribed…

Read More
 

In New Guinea, human thigh bone daggers were hot property: study

New Guinea warriors harvested thigh bones from their dead fathers to fashion into ornamental but deadly daggers used to kill and maim enemies, sometimes to eat them, reported AFP. But why use human bone when equally lethal daggers were made from the shin bones of large, flightless birds called cassowaries — abundant, and easier to…

Read More
 

‘Artificial mole’ could warn of cancer: study

Swiss scientists have developed an experimental skin implant that darkens like a mole when it detects subtle changes in the body that may be an early warning sign of cancer, a study said Wednesday, reported AFP. The implant, or “biomedical tattoo,” as researchers call it, has been tested in lab animals, lasts about a year…

Read More
 

Couples with equal earnings more likely to stay together, says study

Cohabiting couples who have equal earnings are more likely to stay together than couples with unequal earnings. According to a study conducted by Patrick Ishizuka, a postdoctoral fellow at Cornell University’s Cornell Population Center, “equality appears to promote stability”. “Equality in men’s and women’s economic contributions may hold these couples together,” said Ishizuka’s paper, called…

Read More
 

Study finds smoking may cause hearing loss

ISLAMABAD: A new study suggests that smoking affects the ability to hear both high and low frequency sounds. For the study, published in the journal Nicotine and Tobacco Research, researchers included 50,195 people, aged between 20 to 64 years and free of hearing loss. “These results provide strong evidence to support that smoking is a…

Read More
 

A ‘paradigm shift’ in the diagnosis of diabetes: study

NEWS DESK: Scientists on Friday unveiled a revised classification for diabetes, one they said could lead to better treatments and help doctors more accurately predict life-threatening complications from the disease, reported AFP. There are five distinct types of diabetes that can occur in adulthood, rather than the two currently recognised, they reported in The Lancet…

Read More
 

Women report higher life satisfaction in Britain but are more anxious: study

NEWS DESK: The housing crisis is getting worse, Brexit negotiations aren’t easing up any time soon, even hot cross bun prices are on the rise… you’d be forgiven for thinking Britons don’t have a lot to be happy about. However, according to the latest figures from the Office for National Statistics (ONS), the opposite is…

Read More
 

Martial arts can improve attention span in long term: study

NEWS DESK: Martial arts require a good level of physical strength, but those who take up training also need to develop an incredible amount of mental acuity. Mental strength is so important to martial arts that researchers have found karate experts’ stronger punching force may be down to a better control of muscle movement in…

Read More
 

Eating yoghurt can reduce risk of heart disease: study

NEWS DESK: Incorporating more yoghurt into your diet has been associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, a study has claimed, reported The Independent. The study, published in the American Journal of Hypertension, sought to investigate whether increased consumption of yoghurt could benefit adults with hypertension, otherwise known as high blood pressure. The team…

Read More
 
 

Must See

 

Samaa Cartoons

 
 
 

Most Read

 

In the News