Tayyaba’s ‘father’ says agreement with judge’s family is fake

January 11, 2017
Published in Pakistan
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ISLAMABAD: After Tayyaba, a ten-year-old maid allegedly tortured by wife of a serving judge in Islamabad, was produced in the Supreme Court, her case took a new twist.

After Samaa highlighted the issue showing injuries to the girl’s face and hands, Chief Justice of Pakistan, Justice Mian Saqib Nisar, took suo motu notice last week and ordered a full investigation. The incident has spotlighted rampant child labour in the country.

Today, the accused and three couples who claimed to be her parents also appeared in the court.

Her alleged father, Azam, who removed her from a women’s shelter and forgave the judge and his wife following an agreement, revealed in the court that the agreement was fake.

He also disowned any settlement with the accused family.

The disclosed before the judge that he is illiterate therefore his thumb impression was taken on a plane paper.

On the basis of this paper, the judge’s wife had been granted bail in the case.

The three couples claiming her ownership withdrew following the hearing; however, her real parents are yet to be determined.

On court orders, meanwhile, Tayyaba was shifted to women’s shelter.

The court directed police to file a comprehensive report within 10 days, get her psychological examination and provide adequate security.

She was found Sunday in the suburbs of the capital Islamabad and taken for a medical examination. The medical report confirmed torture on her.

She showed signs of torture as a team of doctors observed multiple injuries, burns, blunt injuries and bruises on her face.

She has burn marks on her back and on the left hand. She also has a blunt wound on her face. All her wounds are healing, doctors said.

Tayyaba initially claimed she fell down the stairs and burnt her hands by accident, later telling police she was beaten and had her hands burned on a stove by the judge’s wife. – Samaa/AFP
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Story first published: 11th January 2017

 
 

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