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Wardrobe police? No jeans, t-shirts at work for Islamabad teachers

Federal Directorate of Education issues dress code policy

SAMAA | - Posted: Sep 7, 2021 | Last Updated: 3 weeks ago
SAMAA |
Posted: Sep 7, 2021 | Last Updated: 3 weeks ago

Photo: AFP

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Teachers in Islamabad won't be allowed to wear jeans, tights, or t-shirts to work anymore. The Federal Directorate of Education has issued a dress code policy for all men and women teachers in the capital. A letter issued by the department on Tuesday has instructed the heads of education institutions to ensure teachers "observe reasonably good measures in their physical appearance and personal hygiene". "This includes regular haircut, beard trimming, nail cutting, shower, and use of deodorants/perfumes," it stated. "All the gatekeepers/chowkidars must always be in their recommended uniforms and a uniform should be introduced for support staff." Here is the recommended dress code: Men Weather-appropriate simple and decent shalwar qameez preferably with waistcoat/coat in accordance with weather conditions.Dress shirt (full sleeves preferably with tie) and trousers (dress pants and cotton pants only). Wearing jeans is not allowed in any case.During summers, half-sleeved dress shirts and/or bush shirts can also be worn but t-shirts of all types are not allowed.Only formal shoes (dress shoes, loafers, Moccasins and boots, etc) must be worn. Owing to long-standing hours during teaching comfortable shoes like sneakers and sandals can be worn as well. However, wearing slippers is not allowed at all. During winter, blazers, as well as sweaters, jerseys, and cardigans of decent colors and designs are to be worn. Scarves can be worn with coats but no shawls (chadors) are allowed at all. Women Weather appropriate simple and decent shalwar qameez/trousers shirt with dupatta/shawl. Women are allowed to wear a scarf/hijab while ensuring its clean and neat appearance. Wearing jeans and tights are not allowed in any case. Only formal shoes (pumps, loafers, and mules, etc) are allowed. Owing to long-standing hours during teaching comfortable shoes like sneakers and sandals can be worn as well. Wearing slippers is not allowed at all. During winter, coats, blazers, as well as sweaters (chadars) of decent colors and design are allowed. The letter added that the research had proven that attire left an influence on the perception of the viewers, whether students or others. An outlook imposes a very positive expectation subject to the likeliness and behavioral pattern of students. Teachers across the capital city are, however, didn't seem entirely pleased with the new instructions. A woman teaching at a government college in Islamabad, on condition of anonymity, told SAMAA Digital that the new rules should be applicable to students, not teachers. "We are adults. We know personal hygiene is important. No one needs to tell us to shower, cut our nails, or apply perfume."
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Teachers in Islamabad won’t be allowed to wear jeans, tights, or t-shirts to work anymore. The Federal Directorate of Education has issued a dress code policy for all men and women teachers in the capital.

A letter issued by the department on Tuesday has instructed the heads of education institutions to ensure teachers “observe reasonably good measures in their physical appearance and personal hygiene”.

“This includes regular haircut, beard trimming, nail cutting, shower, and use of deodorants/perfumes,” it stated. “All the gatekeepers/chowkidars must always be in their recommended uniforms and a uniform should be introduced for support staff.”

Here is the recommended dress code:

Men

  • Weather-appropriate simple and decent shalwar qameez preferably with waistcoat/coat in accordance with weather conditions.
  • Dress shirt (full sleeves preferably with tie) and trousers (dress pants and cotton pants only). Wearing jeans is not allowed in any case.
  • During summers, half-sleeved dress shirts and/or bush shirts can also be worn but t-shirts of all types are not allowed.
  • Only formal shoes (dress shoes, loafers, Moccasins and boots, etc) must be worn. Owing to long-standing hours during teaching comfortable shoes like sneakers and sandals can be worn as well. However, wearing slippers is not allowed at all.
  • During winter, blazers, as well as sweaters, jerseys, and cardigans of decent colors and designs are to be worn. Scarves can be worn with coats but no shawls (chadors) are allowed at all.

Women

  • Weather appropriate simple and decent shalwar qameez/trousers shirt with dupatta/shawl.
  • Women are allowed to wear a scarf/hijab while ensuring its clean and neat appearance. Wearing jeans and tights are not allowed in any case.
  • Only formal shoes (pumps, loafers, and mules, etc) are allowed. Owing to long-standing hours during teaching comfortable shoes like sneakers and sandals can be worn as well. Wearing slippers is not allowed at all.
  • During winter, coats, blazers, as well as sweaters (chadars) of decent colors and design are allowed.

The letter added that the research had proven that attire left an influence on the perception of the viewers, whether students or others. An outlook imposes a very positive expectation subject to the likeliness and behavioral pattern of students.

Teachers across the capital city are, however, didn’t seem entirely pleased with the new instructions.

A woman teaching at a government college in Islamabad, on condition of anonymity, told SAMAA Digital that the new rules should be applicable to students, not teachers.

“We are adults. We know personal hygiene is important. No one needs to tell us to shower, cut our nails, or apply perfume.”

 
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