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Meet Asra, Pakistan’s fastest female runner

January 4, 2019
 
In November 2018 she won the gold at the National Athletics Championship



If you’re an athlete in Pakistan, chances are you will have to fight against all odds to make your mark. And if you’re a female athlete, the odds are even higher.

With barely any good coaching, nutrition or training facilities, sportspersons are often on their own.

It is in this backdrop that Pakistani gold medallist Sahib-e-Asra struggles daily to keep running.

For Pakistanis, Asra breaks all stereotypes. Social media was flooded with appreciation for the heart-warming tale of this young girl and the support she received from her father, who is a local imam.

Social media users were pleasantly surprised by Asra’s story and expressed their appreciation for the heart-warming father-daughter duo tale. Some also expressed their optimism about societal progress.

The up-and-coming sports star hails from Faisalabad. In November 2018, she won a gold medal at the National Athletics Championship.

In an interview with Pakistani non-profit Sujag, which was posted by the organisation on its Facebook page on Tuesday, Qari Alam Khan, Asra’s father, said he supported her from the onset of her sporting career. He shattered the notion that members of the clergy oppose women in physically intensive fields.

Asra was a gold medalist before she started her professional career as a sprinter. She was intent on pursuing her passion despite the lack of resources for sportspeople in the country. She was told that support for sportspersons in Pakistan was far behind even when compared to countries like Bangladesh, yet she remained determined to continue.

She said her father, who is an imam, was rather supportive of her career as a sportswoman, despite what people could generally assume.

She also revealed that it was people that they knew, associates and acquaintances that were opposed to the idea and tried to convince her father not to let her carry on with a career as an athlete.

We hope that Asra continues to excel at what she does and that the government also takes notice of the promising young talent.
 
 
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